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Peer Review Review the rough drafts from fellow students using the RHUBRIC GUIDELINES BELOW AND GIVE A SCORE WITH SOME COMMENTS FOR EACH PARAMETER. The rough drafts are attached and labeled as “Rough Draft to Review 1” and “Rough Draft to Review 2”. A few parameters (RHUBRIC TO FOLLOW IS BELOW): Your individual rough drafts should have already been submitted in the “Rough Draft” forum in week five. Choose two different rough drafts to evaluate (when possible, please choose the drafts you will review that have not been reviewed by your classmates or that only have one review.  By doing this, we can better ensure that each of your fellow students has at least one peer review on his or her work—simply put, choose carefully; don’t just pick the first two drafts you see). Each of these reviews should have your feedback provided in a Word or Open Office Document. Utilize the provided rubric (linked above) and include this with your constructive feedback, incorporating specific, positive remarks as well as helpful suggestions so your peer is able to see you genuinely evaluated their rough draft. You will provide this feedback as a reply to each of your two peers within this Peer Review Drop Box which will then be graded upon the close of this week. Peer Review Evaluation Rubric Grading Criteria Maximum Points Meets or exceeds established assignment criteria. 5-7 pages (approximately 1000-1250 words) in length 15 A clear thesis statement 15 Body supports claims presented 15 45 Clearly presents well-reasoned ideas and concepts. Used 10 reputable sources 30 30 Quality of Writing Academic and professional appearance (APA formatting) 15 Grammar and proofreading 10 25 Total 100
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Tiesha Hardison Week 5 GU299 The Rough Draft “Helping All Kids” It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A, It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A! A lot of you all may have heard of that song Y.M.C.A by the Village People. Yes, you guess it my project will be about the YMCA. In 1853 Anthony Bowen founded the first African American YMCA. Langston Hughes wrote poetry and Thurgood Marshall designed legal strategies there. Quite interesting! My project will be discussing the history, background, and what the Y offers for their members. Today the Y focuses on nurturing every child and teen, improving the overall health and well-being also providing opportunities to give back, the Y enables youth, adults, families, and communities to be healthy, confident, connected and secure. The YMCA was founded in 1853. “In 1853 Anthony Bowen founded the first African American YMCA which was what originally called the 12th Street YMCA, which opened in 1912. The structure still stands until this day at 1816 12th St. NW. The Italian Renaissance-style building, designed by Booker T. Washington’s son-in-law, served as black Washington’s community center for much of the 20th century. It was where Langston Hughes wrote poetry and Thurgood Marshall designed legal strategies.” “The Washington Post. “YMCA Anthony Bowen’s Long History in D.C.” YMCA Anthony Bowen’s Long History in D.C. (2013).” The examples support the section topic because it states the background information on the YMCA. For example, when it was founded, by who, and the people that were involved in the making of the Y. Promoting healthy living is one of the most important aspects at the YMCA. “Livestrong at the YMCA is an evidence-informed physical activity program that draws on the safety and benefits of physical activity for survivors, people who have survived cancer. Exercise has been shown to improve cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, body composition, fatigue, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, happiness, and several components of quality of life.” “Heston, Ann-Hilary, Anna Schwartz, Haley Justice-Gardiner, and Katherine Hohman. “Addressing Physical Activity Needs of Survivors by Developing a Community-Based Exercise Program: LIVESTRONG at the YMCA.” Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing19.2 (2015): 213-17.” The examples support the section topic because the Y promotes healthy living and other groups work together with the YMCA to help as well. For example, exercising and helping cancer patients stay healthy. The Y serves over 700,000 children across the country in after school programs. “Recognizing the potential of the afterschool setting for engaging children in physical activity, healthy eating, and education about healthy lifestyles, many stakeholder groups at the state and national levels have worked to develop and adopt standards for obesity prevention in afterschool environments.” “Hohman, Katherine H., and Karah D. Mantinan. “Concerns in Measurement of Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Standards Implementation.” New Directions for Youth Development 2014.143 (2014): 25-43.” The examples support the section topic because the Y have after school programs all over the country which help children with eating healthy, education, overall just living a healthy lifestyle. Bringing people together from all walks of life. “The Y brings people together. We connect people of all ages and backgrounds to bridge the gaps in community needs. The Y nurtures potential. We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to learn, grow and thrive.” “History.” The Y: History. Retrieved from http://www.ymca.net/history/.” The examples support the section topic because not matter your age, race, ethnicity the Y is a place for everyone to come together as one. Youth development creates a way for teens to stay active and healthy. “The YMCA of Greater New York has launched the Y-MVP app, the organization’s first-ever proprietary mobile fitness app. Available for free in the iTunes store, the Y-MVP app uses dynamic exercise “playlists” and digital badges to make fitness fun for teens. The app is based on the Y’s moderate to vigorous physical activity teen fitness challenge, an innovative eight-week program that helps teens increase their daily levels of exercise.” “The YMCA Of Greater New York Fitness App Encourage Healthy Habits: Ebscohost”. Web.a.ebscohost.com.” The examples support the section topic even if teens are not able to join there is still ways for them to get involved. Most teens are distracted by electronic devices, so the fitness app would be great for teens to stay healthy. I will gather my information through websites and talk with a few people that I know personally who have joined the YMCA before. I hope to find out when the YMCA was established, is it really a good organization for smaller children, do parents feel like this is a good program for their children, also do the workers/volunteers enjoy working with the program. Today the Y focuses on nurturing every child and teen, improving the overall health and well-being also providing opportunities to give back, the Y enables youth, adults, families, and communities to be healthy, confident, connected and secure. The YMCA was founded in 1853. Promoting healthy living is one of the most important aspects at the YMCA. The Y serves over 700,000 children across the country in after school programs. Bringing people together from all walks of life. Youth development creates a way for teens to stay active and healthy. It’s important that my audience/readers to remember that the YMCA is a wonderful program for everyone. We should all want to live a healthier lifestyle. That’s one reason why I choose this programs to talk about because some of my other health classes I take there are so many diseases people die from these days and all people have to do is change their lifestyle, whether is eating healthy or just exercising. What I would like my readers to do with this information is to want to change the way they live. Living a healthy lifestyle for you and your family.
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Running Header: THE GREAT IMPACT OF THE WARRIOR OUTREACH 0 The Great Impact of the Warrior Outreach Allen Jones Grantham I think that there are some really good things that can come from a community partnership. When a business gets together with a nonprofit both parties can benefit from that partnership. However, for some of the businesses working in the partnership they are only there for their personal gain and perception. I have seen this in a lot of different scenarios through my time and it really makes me question that business and what kind of morals that business has. The Warrior Outreach is a nonprofit that benefits the veterans and without them and all their partners the Community would have a lot more people in need. For me one of the most important things in the communities that I have lived, my adult life, in is community partners. After joining the army in 2004 and being stationed at Fort Hood I realized that the community may seem large but in comparison there are only a few people that know what you are going through. Statically less than one percent of Americans serve in the military so that means when organizations, like the Warrior Outreach, require heavily on the partnerships that they have with the community. The Warrior outreach is a Nonprofit organization that works with military veterans, Service Members, and their Families offering a wide variety of equine related activities. Warrior Outreach Ranch offers confidence building instructional and relaxing opportunities to interact with horses and enjoy family bonding. The Warrior Outreach main focus is to help veterans who are returning home and not have to adjust to life after Traumatic events and returning home from deployments. In the article of Project Valor, it is stated that “The prevalence of PTSD in service men and women returning from overseas operations in Afghanistan and Iraq is estimated 10% immediately post-deployment, with and approximate doubling of the prevalence within five years after deployment.” (Rosen , et al., 2012). This statistic is scary if you are living in a military community and even more shocking when you have been to two tours of duty in Iraq. That is why it is important for organization like the Warrior Outreach to be operating in and around the military communities. One of the best partnerships that this organization has is that they work great with Fort Benning. Fort Benning is located on 182 thousand acers and is the located in Columbus, Georgia and Phoenix City Alabama with a population of around 250 thousand people and is the third largest city in Georgia. If it was not for Fort Benning, the Warrior Outreach would not have the ability to do everything that it does for the community. Fort Benning in 2010 was the 3rd largest army base in populations and 5th largest in land and at some point 90% of the army will do some type of training at the instillation. The partnership between the Warrior Outreach and Fort Benning is a bond that help the owner of Warrior Outreach Retired Command Sergeant Major Sam Rhodes (CSM ret Rhodes) has built over the years of working and living on and around Fort Benning. Most of the volunteers that work at the ranch for Warrior Outreach come from Fort Benning. He also has partnerships with a lot of different businesses and organization in the community of Columbus Georgia. The complete list can be found at http://warrioroutreach.org/sponsors-2/ but I will talk specifically about a couple of the organizations like The Home Depot. After reading the Article, The Debate Over Doing Good, I think Home Depot really does a lot in leading the way for their community outreach programs. They do and help at the Warrior Outreach with donations as well. The partnerships at the ranch that I would say is needed is that they really do need someone in the feed business. It is not easy or cheap to feed all the horses that they man has. He does an amazing job but that could really cut down on his operating budget and really help them do more community outreach. The issues, that I see, with community partnerships is that when and organization only wants to be a partner for the benefit of the company’s bottom line or to erase a scandal that the business did. I like how the article the Debate Over Doing Good states it. “In the wake of corporate scandals, corporate social responsibility builds goodwill—and can pay off when scandals or regulatory scrutiny inevitably arise” (Grow, Hamm , & Lee, 2005). I feel this is why a lot of businesses like to participate in partnerships with nonprofits. I also found another article, posted by a guest on the Razoo Foundation, the article is How Businesses Can Benefit from nonprofit partnerships this person goes on to say that “if your motives aren’t genuine, and merely a means to an end, people will notice” (Guest, 2012). As I was reading this article and looking at way for profits can affect their partnerships I think of BP and how they completely overlook safety regulations to make the company more money. Then three years later BP, “The company broke from convention and sided against almost all major oil companies when it decided not to pursue the reversal of the U.S. Renewable fuel standard” (Kaye, 2015). I then see how the statement makes since to me because would they have done that had it not been for all the bad publicity they got from their laps in judgment. The culture around the military has been ever changing over the years. When you have an organization like the military where people come from all different backgrounds and everyone has their own system of values, beliefs, behaviors, and norms it really becomes difficult for one organization to help so many different types of people. The Warrior Outreach really does a good job with just helping anyone that needs help. In the Article Military Culture and the Transition to Civilian Life talks about a lot of the issues that are faced by veterans. Part of the article talks about the reintegration process and it states “Reintegration can be conceptualized as finding purpose in life; having interpersonal relationships; being employed or in school; and having access to housing, health care, and other benefits” (Pease, Billera, & Gerard, 2016). The Warrior Outreach does a great job at helping veterans of all types achieve these objectives. Not only does the organization help people with their struggles with PTSD they help disabled vets when in need. On several different occasions Sam, the owner, takes people out and helps the veterans. Do routine housework, painting, or even just cleaning up the yard. Once the outreach leaves the house these people can find a purpose in life and see that they are not alone in their battles through everyday life. I have never once seen them not help someone in need. Just the other day Sam was honored by the Atlanta Braves Baseball team as a community hero. As I talked to him, at the game, he introduced me to a lot of the people that work at the ranch. This man has made connections with businesses and a lot of them only hire veterans that are getting out of the military and Sam sends him people that are in need of a job and the pest control business hires them on the spot. As the organization grows their need for volunteers has grown a lot as well. Most people think about volunteering as free labor when you tell them that you are volunteering. Sam and the Warrior Outreach does not see a volunteer like that. He trusts people to make smart decisions and do the right thing. As I work with him he may be obtaining free labor and that benefits him but it does more for me than most people realize. I have made a lasting friend that will help me if I am ever in need and it will also give me experience working in areas that I may not have knowledge in. While reading the article Finding Meaning Through Volunteering they made a statement that I really don’t believe in it said “when their jobs are not meaningful, individuals are more likely to experience wanderlust. As a result, they volunteer an activity commonly perceived as meaningful to compensate for that perceived deprivation” (Todell , 2013). I don’t feel that people volunteer because they are deprived in their jobs. I feel that people volunteer to help the community and gain experience. Myself for example, I spend a lot of time volunteering and have spent over 1 thousand hours since 2012 giving back to my community. This has helped my build a relationship with a lot of different types of people. The things that I learn have also opened doors for me in my current career and benefited me in the long run. I have never used my volunteering as a means to be successful, that mind set will hurt you in the long run. I spend my time to learn new things and to take my knowledge and give it to other people. I often tell people that I am a jack of all trades and a master of none. I know how to work on cars, build metal carport, sew curtains, even make balloon animals, and much more. That has helped me become a well-rounded individual with knowledge in a lot of different situations. That is the main reason that I can contribute to the Warrior Outreach so much. Just the other day Sam and I was talking and he said that he wanted to get my orders deleted so that I can stay in the community and continue to help him and his organization. Sam’s vision for the future of the Warrior Outreach is to help service members so that they don’t end up in his situation. Sam tells in his book, Breaking the Chains of Stigma Associated with Post Traumatic Stress, how he was at a job interview and the guy interviewing him really did not ask him any questions about his resume he only wanted to talk about an article that he did in a local paper. In that article he talked about his struggles with PTSD and how it affected him. There is no doubt that the gentleman doing the interview only looked at Sam and damaged goods. Sam did not get the job but has built the ranch as a way for him to coupe with his PTSD. In the Article Volunteering and Life Satisfaction came to conclude that “volunteering can play a protective role for individuals and increase their well-being in the face of otherwise unsatisfactory life conditions, with coefficients being higher for individuals on the lower end of the well-being distribution” (Binder, 2015). Sam uses his ranch to stay busy and that helps him heal from the stress associated from war and he allows anyone to use and work at the ranch in the hopes that they can obtain their own way of coping with that stress. He wants all service members to be able to succeed upon leaving the service and if his ranch can help he one person then he feels that he has a purpose. As you can see this community is a close knit community that does love the veterans and like to help them anyway they can. The Warrior Outreach has the ability and the connections in the community to keep them successful and maintain the ability to help anyone that he can. Sam is a great combat veteran that wants to make peoples life easier and help them succeed before, during, and after the military. References Binder, M. (2015). Volunteering and Life Satisfaction. Appiled Economics Letters, 874-885. Fort Benning MWR. (n.d.). Retrieved from Fort Benning MWR: http://www.benningmwr.com/documents/acs/Fort%20Benning%20Digital%20Welcome%20Packet.pdf Grow, B., Hamm , S., & Lee, L. (2005). The Debate Over Doing Good. Business Week, 76*78. Guest. (2012, June 7). How Businesses Can Benefit from Nonprofit Partnerships. Retrieved from Razoo Foundation: http://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/07/exxon-to-invest-20-billion-on-us-gulf-coast-refining-projects.html Kaye, L. (2015, Frbruary 19). Five Years After Deepwater Horizon, can BP Repair Its Reputation. Retrieved from Sustainable Brands: http://www.sustainablebrands.com/news_and_views/marketing_comms/leon_kaye/five_years_after_deepwater_horizon_can_bp_repair_its_reputa Pease, J., Billera, M., & Gerard, G. (2016). Military Culture and the Transition to Civilian life. Social Work , 83-86. Rhodes, S. M. (2014). Breaking The Chains of Stigma Associated With Post Traumatic Stress. bloomington: Author House. Rhodes, S. m. (n.d.). Warrior Outreach. Retrieved from Warrior Outreach: http://warrioroutreach.org/ Rosen , R., Marx, B., Maserejian, N., Holowka, D., Gates, M., Sleeper, L., . . . Deane, T. (2012). Project VALOR: Design and methods of longitudinal registry of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in combat ezposed Veterans in the Afghanistan and Iragi Military theaters of operations. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 5-16. Todell , J. B. (2013). Finding Meaning Throung Volunteering. Academy of Management Journal, 1274-1294.
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Using Computer Forensics in Law Enforcement Discuss the evolution of computer forensics in law enforcement cases. Include chain of evidence for Internet or IT items. Develop a PowerPoint presentation for law enforcement leadership on four distinct computer forensic tools: Purpose of tool Can evidence stand up in a court of law? Potential problems that could be encountered Is this tool recommended by government or private organizations? How can this tool be integrated into a larger investigation? Are there any case studies or examples of this tool being used to solve a crime? Specific questions or items to address: Paper: Provide a historical analysis of computer forensics, how it has evolved and how it is currently used by law enforcement. Presentation: Purpose of tool Can evidence stand up in a court of law? Potential problems that could be encountered Is this tool recommended by government or private organizations? How can this tool be integrated into a larger investigation? Are there any case studies or examples of this tool being used to solve a crime? Criteria: 2-3 page paper, APA format with a minimum of two references and 10-12 slide presentation, following APA format with a minimum of four properly cited references Grading Criteria Assignments Maximum Points Meets or exceeds established assignment criteria 40 Demonstrates an understanding of lesson concepts 20 Clearly presents well-reasoned ideas and concepts 30 Uses proper mechanics, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling and APA formatting 10 Total 100