Reflective Paper


PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT A BID FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT IF YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND EDUCATION TERMS AND CONCEPTS. ALL DIRECTIONS MUST BE FOLLOWED AND NO PLAGARIASM. MY SCHOOL USES SOFTWARE TO DETECT COPIED MATERIAL.

Please read these assignment instructions before writing your paper, and re-read them often during and after the writing process to make sure that you are fulfilling all of the instructions. Please also utilize the assignment guidance below and the template provided.

The primary function of human resource management is to increase the effectiveness and contribution of employees in the attainment of organizational goals and objectives. Consider all the areas of HRM that have been discussed in class:

  • EEO and Affirmative Action,
  • Human resources planning, recruitment, and selection,
  • Human resources development,
  • Compensation and benefits,
  • Safety and Health, and
  • Employee and labor relations.

Submit a Reflective Paper in which you explain how these aspects work together to perform that primary function.  Are any aspects more important than the others?  Why or why not?  How do you believe the HRM role can be optimized for shaping organizational and employee behavior?

The Reflective Paper must:

(a) Identify the main issues in the chosen area

(b) Demonstrate new learning that has occurred

(c) Include class activities or incidents that facilitated learning and understanding

(d) Identify specific current and/or future applications and relevance to your workplace

(e) Reflect the potential impact to your future career plans or even in your personal life at home.

The emphasis of the Reflective Paper should be on parts ‘d’ and ‘e,’ and on the application of new learning.  Explore, in depth, the benefits of the new learning and understanding that has taken place.

Writing the Reflective Paper

The Reflective Paper:

Must be seven double-spaced pages in length, excluding the cover page and reference page, and formatted according to APA.

Must include a title page with the following:

    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course number and name
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted

Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement.

Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.

Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis.

Must use at least one scholarly source, in addition to the text.

Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Must include, on the final page, a Reference List that is completed according to APA style as outlined in your approved style guide and has at least one reference in addition to the text.

Reflective Paper – HR
Running head: TITLE 0 Title Name Course Instructor Title References
Reflective Paper – HR
APA Made Easy: A Student’s Guide to APA Formatting Ashford Writing Center June 2014* *Revised bi -annually for clarity and modification. Adapted by the AWC from original, created by Dr. Stephanie Lassitter, College of Education, and Jennifer Richardson, Curriculum and Innovation Division 2 Table of Contents The Mechanics of APA Style …………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 In -Text Citations …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 Citing Page or Paragraph Numbers ………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing ………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Quotation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Block Quotation ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Signal Phrases …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 Paraphrase ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 Secondary Sources: Citing a Source Within a Source ………………………………………………………….. 8 Author Citations ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8 One Author …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 Two Authors ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 Citing Three to Five Authors ………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 Six or More Authors …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 Heading Levels …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10 Tables and Figures ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Tables ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 Figure ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 Appendices …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12 Seriation (Using Lists in a Paper) ………………………………………………………………………………….. 133 Numerical List …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 3 Bulleted List ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 A Seriated List Wi thin a Paragraph …………………………………………………………………………….. 134 General Formatting Guidelines ……………………………………………………………………………………… 144 Peer -Reviewed Articles …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 What Are Peer -Reviewed Articles? ……………………………………………………………………………… 16 What Are Non Peer-Reviewed Publications? ………………………………………………………………. 166 Annotated Bibliography ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 177 Books: Hard Copy and Digital ………………………………………………………………………………………. 177 Digital Copy: Vital Source …………………………………………………………………………………………… 188 Constellation TM Textbook …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 188 Online Sources ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 19 Online Scholarly Journal Article w ith DOI……………………………………………………………………. 19 Online Scholarly Journal Article Without DOI ………………………………………………………………. 19 Online Newspapers or Magazines ………………………………………………………………………………… 19 Web Article, No Author ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 20 Citing an Entity or Organization ………………………………………………………………………………….. 20 Citing All Other Online, Unauthored Articles ……………………………………………………………….. 20 Instructor Guidance in an Ashford Online Course ………………………………………………………….. 20 Reports ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21 Federal Government Agency ………………………………………………………………………………………. 21 Blogs………………………………………………………………… …………………………21 Audiovisual Materials ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22 4 Personal Communication ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 Personal Communications: Interviews, Personal Correspondences, Emails ……………………… 22 Please cite this document as follows: ……………………………………………………………………………. 23 The Mechanics of APA Style The American Psychological Association (APA) is one of the largest scientific and professional associations in the United States . APA style is a set of rules and guidelines provided by this association to ensure a professional standard of scholarly writing . APA S tyle is the required citation style in all Ashford University courses. As students and researchers , it is important that we give credit to those whose ideas have contributed to our own work . As academic writers, we draw from and build on the work of previous scholars and professionals. When we present our writing, we want to show our readers that we are knowledgeable about o ur topics and that we have become informed by seeking out works written by others who are experts on these topics. When we document our sources, we share with our readers the research we have done to develop the balanced and reasoned positions that we present in our writing. To demonstrate our credibility as writers and professionals, we use APA style —an agreed upon set of rules and guidelines—to lead our readers to the original source material that we have used in preparing our work. These rules and guidelines comprise the formal conventions for writing that are respected in our professional fields and help us to communicate professionally with colleagues and peers. APA citation s tyle focuses on both the author and the date the article or study was published. This focus on the date is important since things change rapidly in our fields of study. In -T ext Citations In -text citations are also referred to as parenthetical citations . In -text citations are citations used within the body of the paper, whereas the term reference refers to the complete citation , which is typically listed on the references page. Why use in-text citations? In -text citations are considered trails on a map to show sources you consulted and used in your journey during the res earch phase of the writing process. 5 Citations signal for the reader whose ideas belong to the writer and whose ideas belong to an outside source. For example, the in- text citation for a reading from Hibel, Farkas, and Morgan (2010) would be cited as follows: ” Certain groups of students are routinely found to be overrepresented (compared to their share in the school -aged population) in special education classrooms ” (Hibel, Farkas , & Morgan, 2010, p. 313). The same quotation c ould also be presented as follows: According to Hibel, Farkas , and Morgan (2010), “ Certain groups of students are routinely found to be overrepresented (compared to their share in the school -aged population) in special education classrooms ” (p. 313). Citing Page or Paragraph Numbers The APA prefers that writers include page numbers in citations for direct quotes. If page numbers are not available or are in consistent, cite paragraph numbers. Citation for a text with page numbers: (Zirkel, 2011, p. 262). 6 Citation for a range of pages within a text: (Zirkel , 2011, pp. 262–263). Citation for a text without page numbers: (Zirkel, 2011, para. 4). Writing tip: Using a variety of citation techniques will enhance the flow and readability of your paper . For example: “Teachers must create a learning environment that is emotionally and psychologically safe because English Language Learners are very sensitive to the classroom setting” (Allison & Rehm, 2011, p. 23). Allison and Rehm (2011) noted, “Teachers must create a learning environment that is emotionally and psychologically safe because English Language Learners are very sensitive to the classroom setting” (p. 23). Note: The author’s last name and date of publication always remain together. The paragraph or page number in parentheses indicates when you leave the ideas of an outside source and return to your own. Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Quotation A quotation is made by using the original wording from an outside source and incorporating th ose words into your own writing. The words from the outside source will be clearly marked as belonging to another and enclosed in quotation marks. When quoting fewer than 40 words, place quotation marks around the entire passage, followed by the citation, such as: “ Technology can take on several roles in education, such as role of resources, role of delivery system, or productivity ” (Lee et al. , 2013, p. 134). Block Quotation Quotations that are more than 40 words in length should be indented a ha lf inch (the same length as a paragraph’s indentation). Quotation marks are not placed around the cited material; rather, the indentation signifies that the material is a direct quote. Lastly, the period is placed at the end of the quoted material (not at the end of the citation ) as shown here: 7 Signal Phrases In order to give your reader a signal that you will be integrating information borrowed from a nother source, use a signal phrase . A signal phrase introduces the passage and tells something about the source and author. Think of this signal as a way to lead into the quote by preparing readers for what they’re about to read. Here are some examples: • Lee, Waxman, Wu, Wichko, and Lin (2013) explained the multi -layered dynamic of technology in e ducation: • Tess (2013) discussed social media trends… • According to Johnson (2009), t here are various studies dedicated to issues in education… • Phillips and Lyons (2011) argued for the need for yearly peer reviews among faculty… Without a signal phrase and clear citation, the reader might assume that your excellent ideas all came from an outside source. Paraphrase A paraphrase is taking the ideas of an outside source and putting those ideas into your own words. Paraphrases do not need quotation marks, but they do need to be cited similarly to a 8 direct quotation by placing the author’s last name, year of publication, and paragraph or page number at the end of the paraphrased passage (strongly preferred by APA style guide). The table below shows a side -by -si de comparison of a quote, paraphrase , and summary using the same scholarly source: Original Quotation Paraphrase Summary Tess (2013) noted that “Researchers have been examining the role that social media plays in the higher education classroom. Some of the work has highlighted the affective outcomes of SNS integration. A few studies investigated learning outcomes and student achievement in relationship to the educational use of social media in college courses. While the majority of studies reported positive affordances, there was evidence of drawbacks as well ” (p. A62). Tess (2013) discussed the popularity of social media within higher education, noting that studies have investigated and reported both positive and drawbacks (p. A62). Tess (2013) analyzed the usage and impact of social media in the college classroom. Not e: W hen summarizing, you do not need to include the page or paragraph number —just the author’s name and date of publication. Secondary Sources: Citing a Source W ithin a Source If you find a quote in a source (secondary source) that cites content or ideas presented in another source (primary source) , consider loc ating the original source . The use of secondary sources in your paper should be kept to a minimum. For example, if you found a quote by Eijkman (2008) in Tess’ s (2013) publication, but could not find Eijkman’s original piece, here is how you would cite Eijkman (2008) as a secondary source : Eijkman (2008) argued that social media allows for “’non- foundational network-centric learning spaces’” (as cited in Tess, 2013, p. A62). Author Citations One Author 9 When citing a work written by a single author, refer to the last name, year of publication, and page number, and sepa rate each element with a comma. For example: “ Textbooks are ra pidly becoming a thing of the past” ( Williams, 2012, p. 34). Or Williams (2012) noted, “Textbooks are rapidly becoming a thing of the past” (p.34). As a reminder, if page numbers are not available, use paragraph numbers. Two Authors When providing a parenthetical citation for a work by two authors, use an ampersand (&) between the authors’ last names, followed by date of publication, and page number: “Part of the reason that business educators may be hesitant to interject discussions of the public policies and how they came about into their lectures and class discussions is a long -standing hesitancy to bring politics into the classroom” (Cornwall & Dennis, 2012, p. 13). As illustrated below, a n ampersand would not be used in the signal phra se. Cornwall and Dennis (2012) argued, “ Part of the reason that business educators may be hesitant to interject discussions of the public policies and how they came about into their lectures and class discussions is a long -standing hesitancy to bring politics into the classroom” (p. 13). Citing Three to Five Authors When providing in -text citations for works by three to five authors, cite all authors in the first citation. However, in subsequent citations, simply cite the first author’s last name followed by the Latin abbreviation et al (not italicized and with a period after al ), which means “and others.” First citation in your paper: Hay, Hodgkinson, Peltier, and Drago (2004) Subsequent citations in your paper: (Hay et al., 2004) Six or More Authors When citing a source written by six or more authors, reference the first author’s last name, followed by et al . For example, an article written by Strongin, Cole, Bullock, Banthia, Craypo, Sivasubramanian, Samuels, Garcia, and Lafleur (2004) would be cite d as follows: 10 First and subsequent citations as part of a signal phrase: Strongin et al. (2004) First and subsequent parenthetical citations: ( Strongin et al., 2004) If you secure a source that does not have an author’s name or organization listed, determine the entity responsible for the content. Don’t guess! For example, if citing a definition from an electronic version of the dictionary, cite as follows: ( Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary , 2013). The dictionary entry will be listed on the references page beginning with the term in the author position: Pollinate. (2013). In Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary.Retrieved from http://www.merriam- webster.com/dictionary/pollinate Heading Level s Students sometimes confuse the terms running head with heading level . The running head, as previously discussed, is placed within the top margin of your paper. Heading levels, however, can be placed anywhere in your paper as a way to classify or organize your paper into sections. There are five levels : the first three levels are more commonly used in Ashford University assignments, whereas levels four and five may be used in longer papers ( e.g., a master’s thesis). As a general rule, check with your instructor about formatting expectations. Please no te: Headings are not used for Introductions, and Conclusion heading format s depend entirely on your instructor or college preference. Heading Level Template Example 1 Centered, Boldface, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading Choosing the Right University 2 Flush Left, Boldface, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading Program Offerings 3 Indented, boldface, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period. Reputation of programs. 4 Indented, boldface, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period. Virtual programs. 5 Indented, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period. Hybrid courses. 11 Tables and Figures When used correctly, t ables and figures offer visual illustration s of your paper’s findings. Make sure to incorporate tables and figures into your paper if they were requested by your professor and if they support the main point(s) in your p aper. If you determine that they serve as more of a supplement to your paper , insert these elements as append ices (see the next topic on organizing appendices). Table s Data presented in rows or columns is considered a table , and should be referred to as such. Refer to a table placed within your paper by number: (see T able 2). Include a general overview (not a specific, point -by -point analysis of the table) as illustrated below . Note: The words Adapted from should be used only if you have modified the table in some way. If you are simply reproducing a t able from another source, use the words Reprinted f rom. Figure Data provided as an illustration ( e.g., a chart or photo) is referred to as a figure. Refer to a figure placed within your paper by number: (see Figure 1). 12 Appendices Appendices are “inserts” with additional information that add to the paper without disrupting the “flow” of the paper; for example, tables, graphs, or other information that support or supplement your paper’s focus. Appendices are placed after the references page in order of mention within the paper. If the paper includes one appendix, label it Appendix (without italics), centered. Then, include the title of the appendix underneath, center ed and boldface d. When including more than one appendix, organi ze each appendix after the references page in order mentioned in the paper: Appendix A, Appendix B, and so on. Under the title “Appendix,” center and bold the descriptive title for the material. The appendix is inserted after the references page. The ab ove example illustrates Appendix E, assuming that the student included Appendix A, Appendix B, and so on. 13 Seriation (Using L ists in a Paper) Seriated lists are often used in a paper for the purpose of organization and clarity. However, as a writing tip, avoid the overuse of seriated lists in a paper. Here are the three types of seriated lists: Numerical List Numerical lists are used to establish a process, a hierarchy, or a chronological order of events, as illustrated below. Students were asked to complete the following steps: 1. Register online using their student identification number . 2. Log into the site with their new usernames and passwords . 3. Complete the survey. Note: The seriated list should include a period when a complete sentence, or semicolon when considered part of the signal sentence above ; if so, the last point on the list should include a period to conclude the list and the preceding sentence . Bulleted List Bulleted lists do not have a specific order, as illustrated below. Dillon’s (2012) research concluded that successful leadership of virtual teams is achieved by: • establish ing positive immediacy behaviors when replying to emails from virtual colleagues; • creat ing a listserv group to share relevant news; and • host ing weekly meetings via Skype, Google Meet, or other web -friendly programs. A Seriated List Within a Paragraph Brief se riated lists may also be used within a paragraph organized by (a), (b), and so on, as illustrated below. Dillon’s (2012) research concluded that successful leadership of virtual teams is achieved by: (a) establish ing positive immediacy behaviors when repl ying to emails from virtual colleagues; (b) 14 c reat ing a group listserve to share relevant news; and, (c) host ing weekly meetings via Skype, Google Meet, or other web- friendly programs. Note: When using seriation within a paragraph, remember to separate elements wi th a semicolon (not a period) . General Formatting Guidelines • The title, “References” should be centered (no bold). • Double space the references page just like the rest of your paper . • Do not use underlining, no bold. • Italics should be used for journal , book, and film titles. • Leave out professional credentials (i.e. Ed D, PhD). • Personal communications (i.e., emails, interviews) are not listed on the references page. • The first line of each citation should be left aligned, but the subsequent lines i n the citation are indented (choose “hanging indent” in paragraph formatting in Microsoft Word) , as shown in this example: To access an example of a completed R eferences page, click here . A partial example is available on the next page. 16 Peer -Reviewed Articles What Are Peer- Reviewed A rticles? Peer -reviewed or scholarly articles are sources that have been evaluated by the author’s peers (members of the discipline) before bein g published. When doing research on a topic, writers should be able to trust these sources and the information given. Peer -reviewed publications are first closely scrutinized by other experts in the field, meaning that if a researcher publishes an article on Alzheimer’s disease treatment in a journal, for example, other scholars would have reviewed the article closely bef ore the article would be recommended for publication. What A re Non P eer- Reviewed P ublications? N ewspaper articles, wikis (such as Wikipedia), blogs, editorials, and trade magazine articles are not peer -reviewed or scholarly. We refer to these sources as “popular” sources. They may offer correct and useful information; however, writers in these genres are not required to cite their sources and are not held to the same standards of research as those who write for scholarly and/or peer -reviewed publications . Whenever outside sources are borrowed and used in your paper, you must include in- text citations and a references page. The in -text citations should appear in the main body of your paper, and the references page is inserted at the end of your paper. When asked to provide peer -reviewed sources in your assignment, begin your search using the Ashford Online Library. Depending on the database used, you will see that there is an option to limit your search to peer -reviewed articles and full -text offerings only. Limiting your search will provide you with only those articles that are peer-reviewed and full y available through our library (see below). Keep in mind that limiting your search to “full- text articles only” saves time by filtering out dozens of articles that may not be available via the Ashford University Library. For example, if you wish to search for peer -reviewed , full-text articles via the EBSCOhost database, limit your search for both, as shown below: 17 Annotated Bibliography An annotated bibliography is a list of works that you may use to research a topic . It is similar to a references page; however, the main difference is you will include a brief summary of each source beneath each citation entry , which means that you will summarize the source in your own words rather than directly quoting the source. Depending on what your instructor asks of you, a summary may include just an over view of the source, and/or an evaluation of the source’s worth and reliability. Click here for a sample Annotated Bibliography . Books: Hard Copy and Digital Hard Copy Template: Author, A. A. , & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of book: Not capitalized . City, State (with abbreviated initials) : Publisher. Example: Brown, A. , & Green, T. (2011). The essentials of instructional design: Connecting 18 fundam ental principles with process and practice (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River , NJ : Pearson. Sample Quote: Brown and Green (2011) noted: “…people represent information in their minds as single or aggregated sets of symbols” (p. 30). Digital Copy: Vital Source Template: Author, A. A. ( Year of publication). Title of book: Not capitalized [e-delivery platform ]. City, State abbreviation : Publisher. Example: Armstrong, D., Henson, K., & Savage, T. (2009). Teaching today: An introduction to education (8th ed.) [Vital Source digital version] . Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Sample Quote: “Your professional development as a teacher did not begin when you entered your teacher -preparation program” (Armstrong, Henson , & Savage, 2009, p. 30) . Constellation TM Textbook Print Copy : Author, A. (Year of publication). Title of book . City, State: Publisher. Example: Lefrancois, G.R. ( 2012). Children’s journeys: Exploring early childhood. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Sample “In practice, research methods are determined by the questions researchers want Quote: to answer” (Lefrancois, 2012, p. 28). Electronic Copy: Author, A. (Year of publication). Title of book: Subtitle of book [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/ Example: Witt, G. A., & Mossler, R. A. (2010). Adult development and life assessment [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/ In -Text Citation: “Quote” (Witt & Mossler, 2010, Section 0.0, “Section Title,” para. #). Reprinted Material in an Anthology or Collection When using an article or story from a collection of works (such as an anthology), look to see if the article is a reprint. This information is usually found in the table of contents, and/or at the beginning of the paper, article , or story. If the year is listed, cite both the original publication year and the year of the published collection within the citation, and in the i n-text citation, as shown: 19 Template: Author, A. (Anthology Publication Date). Title of article, not capitalized. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), The title of anthology (pp. xx–xx). City, State Abbreviation: Publisher. (Original work published in YEAR ). Example: King, S. (2010). Why we crave horror movies. In J. Nadell, J. Langan , & E. A. Comodromos (Eds.), The Longman reader: Rhetoric, reader, research guide & handbook (12th ed.) (pp. 402- 403). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. (Original work published 1982) Sample Quote: “I think that we’re all mentally ill: those of us outside the asylums only hide it a little better — and maybe not all that much better, after all” (King, 1982/2010, p. 402). Online Sources Online Sch olarly Journal Article with DOI DOI stand s for digital object identifier , which is a unique alpha-numeric code (usually starting with the number 10 and containing a suffix and a prefix assigned to a published article). When a DOI is available, use this code instead of the URL. This information is important to consider as you cite sources retrieved from the Ashford University Library. Template: Author, A. A. ( Year of publication ). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume (issue number if available) , page range/number . doi: xx.xxxx/ x.xxx -xxxx.xxxx.xxx.x Example: Sanderson, C., Lobb, E. A., Mowll, J., Butow, P. N., McGowan, N., & Price, M. A. (2013). Signs of post -traumatic stress disorder in caregivers following an expected death: A qualitative study. Palliative Medicine, 27(7), 625–31. doi: 10.1177/0269216313483663 Sample Quote: “The power of the experience is suggested by frequent use of words connoting physical impact, and sometimes associated expressions of pain” (Sanderson et al., 2013, p. 627). Online Schola rly Journal Article Without DOI Template: Author, A. A. ( Year of publication ). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume (issue number if available), xx –xx. Retrieved from URL (no end punctuation) Example: Eggerton, J. (2013). Chris Dodd takes his ba ttle to the people. Broadcasting & Cable, 143 (23), 8 –9. Retrieved from http://heathnet.org Sample Quote: “We need to frame the debate more about the positive things we do and why piracy really hurts [consumers], in addition to whatever damage it does to our industry, to independent 20 filmmakers maybe more so than even the studios, as rough as it is on them” (Egg erton, 2013, p. 8). Online Newspapers or Magazines When using an online article from the Internet that is accessible to the general public, include the direct URL. Template: Author, A. (Year, Month and Day of publication ). Title of internet article. Titl e of Newspaper or Magazine. Retrieved from URL Example: Egan, S. (2009, July 8). Using a robot to ease a child’s pain. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/09/using -a -robot -to -ease- a- childs -pain/?hp Sample Quote: Egan (2009) noted, “ Health care workers have a new tool to ease needle anxiety in children: a talking robot” (para. 1 ). Web Article, No Author This section is important because you may be asked to research articles related to current events, using a general web search (non- library based). To understand how to cite articles without authors listed, consider both examples: Citing an Entity or Organization If an au thor is not listed, cite the organization or entity that authored the article. In some cases, the author and entity cannot be determined, therefore, place the organization or entity in the author position. For example, organizations can include the Cente rs for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, etc. Template: Entity or Organization. (Year of publication ). Title of article. Retrieved from URL Example: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). Prescription painkiller epidemic among women. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/media/dpk/2013/dpk- Prescription%20drug%20overdose.html Sample Quote: According to the Centers for Dise ase Control and Prevention (2013 ), “ Women are dying from prescription painkiller overdoses at rates never seen before, according to a new CDC Vital Signs ” (pa ra. 1 ). Citing All Other Online, Unauthored Articles 21 As noted, if the author and entity cannot be determined, place the title of the article in the author position. Template: Title of article. (Year of publication ). Retrieved from URL Example: Egypt gets new prime minister. (2013 ). Retrieved from http://news.msn.com/world/egypt – gets -a-new -prime -minister -billions -in-aid Sample Quote: “Egypt named an interim prime minister on Tuesday and rich Gulf states poured in $8 billion in aid, as the biggest Arab nation sought ways out of a crisis a day after troops killed dozens of Islamists ” (“ Eygpt gets new prime minister,” 2013, para. 1 ). Instructor Guidance in an Ashford Online Course Template: Instructor, A. A. (Year of upload ). Course ID: Week X Title of module. Retrieved from URL Example: Lienau, M. (201 3). EDU 623: Introduction to teaching and learning: Week 1 instructor guidance. Retrieved from myeclassonline.com Sample Quote: “NCLB sets forth a framework of accountability for all schools in four areas. Schools must meet the required accountability level in each of the four areas to ‘meet the criteria’ for the year ” ( Lienau, 2013, para. 22 ). Note: Provide the general UR L “myeclassonline.com” because A UO’s eCollege courses are password protected, and therefore not available to the general public. Reports Federal Government Agency Template: Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of report (Report number, if applicable). Retrieved from [w ebsite information and URL or database]. Example: Lingenfelter, P. E., Wright, D. L., & Bisel, T. M. (2005). State higher education finance, FY 2004 (SHEF Report). Retrieved from http://www.sheeo.org Sample Quote: “The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI -U) in the Chicago -Gary – Kenosha area increased 0.5 percent in May, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported ” (Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 201 3, para. 1). 22 Blogs Blogs are not considered scholarly sources, but on occasion, you may find a blog written by an expert who contributes to your research. If the author’s name is not listed (a practice common in blogs) include the screen name, as illustrated below: Template: Blog Title (Year, Month and Day of publication ). Title of article [Blog post ]. Retrieved from URL Example: Internet Time Blog (2013 , July 08 ). I wouldn’t call it informal learning [Blog post] . Retrieved from http://www.internettime.com/ Sample Quote: “Better I should have talked about Experiential Learning , for that’s the informal learning with the most impact. People learn by doing ” ( Internet Time Blog , 201 3, para. 4 ). 23 Audiovisual Materials If the video is embedded in the course and is retrieved from an outside resource that AU has an account for but students cannot directl y access (e.g., Intelecom videos), include the name of the database or video library in the retrieval element and provide context for students on the line below the reference that states “This video is available [can be accessed] through your online course .” Personal Communication Personal Communications: Interviews, Personal Correspondences, Emails Personal communications such as interviews, personal correspondences (phone call, meetings), and emails are considered non- published sources because the materi al cannot be retrieved; therefore, do not list personal communication on the references page. List the individual providing the quote (i.e., interviewee), the words personal communication, and the date the discussion took place, as shown here: Example: (D . Williams, personal communication, August 1, 2012) . Please cite this document as follows: Lassitter, S., & Richardson, J. (2013). APA made easy . Unpublished manuscript, College of Education, Ashford University, Clinton, IA. Template: Producer, A. (Producer). (Year). Title of video [Description]. Retrieved from [URL or database]. Examples: American Psychological Association. (Producer). (2000). Behaviorism [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.xxx Bodrova, E. (Writer) & Davidson, F. W. (Producer). (2000). Building literacy competencies in early childhood [Video file]. Retrieved from the Films On Demand database. Note: If students can readily access the material online, the URL would appear in the retrieval element of the reference. If they cannot readily access online, the database information would be stated in the retrieval element of the reference (e.g., Films On Demand).
Reflective Paper – HR
Reflective Paper PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT A BID FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT IF YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND EDUCATION TERMS AND CONCEPTS. ALL DIRECTIONS MUST BE FOLLOWED AND NO PLAGARIASM. MY SCHOOL USES SOFTWARE TO DETECT COPIED MATERIAL. Please read these assignment instructions before writing your paper, and re-read them often during and after the writing process to make sure that you are fulfilling all of the instructions. Please also utilize the assignment guidance below and the template provided. The primary function of human resource management is to increase the effectiveness and contribution of employees in the attainment of organizational goals and objectives. Consider all the areas of HRM that have been discussed in class: EEO and Affirmative Action, Human resources planning, recruitment, and selection, Human resources development, Compensation and benefits, Safety and Health, and Employee and labor relations. Submit a Reflective Paper in which you explain how these aspects work together to perform that primary function.  Are any aspects more important than the others?  Why or why not?  How do you believe the HRM role can be optimized for shaping organizational and employee behavior? The Reflective Paper must:  (a) Identify the main issues in the chosen area (b) Demonstrate new learning that has occurred (c) Include class activities or incidents that facilitated learning and understanding (d) Identify specific current and/or future applications and relevance to your workplace (e) Reflect the potential impact to your future career plans or even in your personal life at home.  The emphasis of the Reflective Paper should be on parts ‘d’ and ‘e,’ and on the application of new learning.  Explore, in depth, the benefits of the new learning and understanding that has taken place. Writing the Reflective Paper The Reflective Paper: Must be seven double-spaced pages in length, excluding the cover page and reference page, and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Must include a title page with the following: Title of paper Student’s name Course number and name Instructor’s name Date submitted Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement. Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought. Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis. Must use at least one scholarly source, in addition to the text. Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Must include, on the final page, a Reference List that is completed according to APA style as outlined in your approved style guide and has at least one reference in addition to the text.
Reflective Paper – HR
Reflective Paper – Additional Instructions The Reflective Paper should demonstrate understanding of the reading assignments as well as the implications of new knowledge. The eight-page paper should integrate readings and class discussions into work and life experience. It may include explanation and examples from previous experience as well as implications for future application. The purpose of the Reflective Paper is for you to culminate the learning achieved in the course by describing your understanding and application of knowledge in the field of human resource management. Focus of the Reflective Paper 1. The primary function of human resource management is to increase the effectiveness and contribution of employees in the attainment of organizational goals and objectives. Consider all the areas of HRM that have been discussed in class (I expect to see a section heading for each of these sections in your paper where you discuss each one in detail): EEO and Affirmative Action, Human resources planning, recruitment, and selection, Human resources development, Compensation and benefits, Safety and Health, and Employee and labor relations. 2. After discussing each of those sections in detail, in a separate section, explain how these aspects work together to perform that primary function. 3. Then in a separate section explain, in your opinion, which of these aspects are more important than the others. There is no wrong or right answer, but you must defend your answer in detail. 4. In a final section, discuss how the HRM role can be optimized for shaping organizational and employee behavior. 5. Throughout the paper, or in a separate section all together, (a) identify the main issues in the chosen area, (b) demonstrate new learning that has occurred, (c) include class activities or incidents that facilitated learning and understanding, (d) identify specific current and/or future applications and relevance to your workplace, and (e) reflect the potential impact to your future career plans or even in your personal life at home. The emphasis of the Reflective Paper should be on parts ‘d’ and ‘e,’ and on the application of new learning. Explore, in depth, the benefits of the new learning and understanding that has taken place. Writing the Reflective Paper The Reflective Paper: Must be eight double-spaced pages in length, excluding the cover page and reference page, and formatted according to APA style as outlined in your approved style guide. Must include a cover page that includes: Name of paper Student’s name Course number and name Instructor’s name Date submitted Must include an introductory paragraph with a succinct thesis statement. Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought. Must conclude with a restatement of the thesis and a conclusion paragraph. Must use APA style as outlined in your approved style guide to document all sources. Must include, on the final page, a Reference List that is completed according to APA style as outlined in your approved style guide.
Reflective Paper – HR
1 ESSAY TITLE Magazine, online edition Online journal article, with DOI Entry from edited anthology , print YouT ube video Photograph, no date, no photograph er Photograph, with photographer References Apsolon, M. [markapsolon]. (2011, September 9). Real ghost girl caught on Video Tape 14 [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nyGCbxD848 Batchelder, A. (2010, July 6). Students brains are being digitally rewired [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://literacyispriceless.wordpress.com/ Cayman Islands. (2008). The world factbook . Retrieved from http://www.bartleby.com/br/151.html Cendrowicz, L. (2010, July). Will Europe’s bank stress tests bring calm or spread more fear? Time . Retrieved from http://www.t ime.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2005557,00.html Diaz -Rico, L. T. (2008). A course for teaching English learners . Boston, MA: Pearson. Florian, R. V. (2010). Challenges for interactivist -constructivist robotics. New Ideas in Psychology, 28 (3), 350 –353. doi: 10.1016/j.newideapsych.2009.09.009 Guthrie, W. (2007). This land is your land. In R. DiYanni (Ed.), Literature: Reading fiction, poetry, and drama (6th ed.) (pp. 897 –898). New York , NY : McGraw -Hill. Kulbis , M. (Photographer). (2006). Men pray [Photograph]. Retrieved April 12, 2006, from: http://accuweather.ap.org/cgi -bin/aplaunch.pl Lessard v. Schmidt, 349 F. Supp. 1078 (E.D. Wis. 1972). Mawson, C. O. S. (Ed.). (n.d.). Roget’s international thesaurus of English words and phrases . Retrieved from http://www.bartleby.com/br/110.html McLaren, M., Thomas, J. (Producers), & Linklater, R. (Director). (2006). Fast food nation [Motion picture]. United States: Fox Searchlight. Nelson Mandela [Photograph]. (n.d.). Retrieved January 10, 2014, from: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes /peace/laureates/1993/mandela -bio.html Web log / Blog Online e ncyclopedia Book , print Online dictionary Film Court decision 2 ESSAY TITLE Online journal article, without DO I Magazine, print Newspaper, online edition Website entry, corporate/government author Santovec, M. (2008). Easing the transition improves grad retention at Trinity U. Women in Higher Education, 17 (10), 32. Retrieved from http://www.wihe.com/ Sloan, C., Booth, S., & Tate, A. (2010, July). Why I became an American. Real Simple , 186 – 192. Tobin Ramos, R. (2010, July 22). UPS profit nearly doubles in second quarter. The Atlanta Journal -Constitution . Retrieved from http://www.ajc.com U.S. Department of Labor, Burea u of Labor Statistics. (2008). Police and detectives. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/oco/pdf/ocos160.pdf Witt, G. A. , & Mossler, R. A. ( 2010 ). Adult d evelopment . Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/books/4 Ashford textbook, online