I provide the instruction and two samples of reflective cover letter. You need to read instruction carefully. And I also provide the two essays that I need to submit with this Portfolio project.

Reflective Cover letter of Portfolio -600words
ePortfolio Cover Letter Assignment Instructions See the red highlight part. Mention that in the cover letter. thanks Task: You will write a letter that reflects upon what you have learned this quarter and indicates how the essays included in the portfolio are indicative of your growth as a writer. While this task is similar to the cover letters you have been writing all quarter, this should be more formal and have a clear, cohesive theme. It should also be broader in scope, discussing your developments in your writing over the entire quarter. For example, you might focus on how you have improved your organization throughout this quarter, or how revision was a crucial influence on your growth as a writer, or how your biggest take-away from the class is a strong understanding of audience. You can structure your letter in any way that makes sense to you, but it should cover the following ground: What have you learned this quarter? Make an argument for how you have met the UWP1 learning outcomes. To answer this question, you might consider: How did you define “good writing” at the beginning of the quarter and how do you define it now? How have you developed as a writer this quarter? How will the knowledge, skills, or experiences from this course help you in the future to accomplish reading/writing tasks in other courses and in professional settings? Why are the essays in your portfolio representative of what you’ve learned? Support your argument by citing specific examples from the projects in your portfolio To answer this question, you will want to explain why you chose to include your problem essay or literacy narrative, and ask yourself: What does including this text tell you about how you write, or about how you assess your work? How does this essay compare with others you’ve written? (I choose the literacy narrative because the revised of this one is more changeling than the problem essay. Mention that in the cover letter.) You’ll also want to explain why the problem essay/literacy narrative and the rhetorical analysis essay demonstrate your ability as a writer. Use specifics from the essays as evidence (you can paraphrase, describe, or use direct quotes). What does this electronic portfolio say about you as a writer, student, researcher, and thinker? To answer this question, you might consider: Why did you include the visuals you did? Why did you design your navigation the way you did? How do the essays, your design decisions, and this reflective letter combine to represent you? Consider how what you learned about reading and composing in UWP1 could apply to your future writing contexts. Throughout the letter, you will want to provide evidence to support your claims. Use this evidence to prove that you have learned what you say you have learned. For example, when discussing what you’ve learned this quarter, you may want to look back at the earlier drafts of your writing, or compare first and final drafts of your essays, or review the cover letters you wrote throughout the quarter. When you describe how the essays in the portfolio are representative of your learning, you will probably paraphrase, describe, or directly quote from the essays. Similarly, when you discuss the design of the portfolio, you may use description, but you can also link to other parts of the portfolio or include screenshots. Genre: The genre is a reflective letter. You will write in first-person and include personal examples, and can directly address your audience.
Reflective Cover letter of Portfolio -600words
Example Portfolio Letter – Student #1 Dear Portfolio Reviewers,             Far be it from me to say that you are about to read what I consider some of the best work I have written to date, but I certainly would not be lying if I said so. I am incredibly proud of my problem and rhetorical analysis essays, not just for the final products but for the steps I took to get there. Much like an essay, my process had a slow beginning, an arduous middle, and a hard-worked-for end, and I am going to take you through it with me now.             Upon reading the prompts for each essay, however many weeks apart, I felt the same overwhelming sense of despair and confusion. What problem did I have that I could write an essay on that wasn’t strictly me complaining, and why would anyone want to read it to begin with? What exactly is a rhetorical analysis and what topic could I possibly choose? I eventually settled on a topic for each, not entirely sure if it was even going to be worth examining, and began the writing process. Even after more than a year in college, I have yet to shake that unfortunate high school tendency to churn out a draft without any planning or preparation. It is what has always worked best for me, and my true ability to write rears its head in the revision process anyway. For the problem essay, a letter to the editor addressing unsafe driving and how it can be self-regulated, I thought about how frustrating my morning commute is every day and I built on my personal experience to engage with the audience. For the rhetorical analysis essay, which compared an academic article about gossip and a corresponding popular article, I relied on my experience as a science student in research to discuss the accuracy of the popular science article and where it differed from the academic article. With those experiences and thoughts in mind, I began to write my first drafts. I read and reread whatever resources were made available to me in class, I did little bouts of revising as I went, and I continually referred back to the prompt to make sure I was really answering the question put in front of me. While it was a struggle at times, I knew that with feedback and the revising process, I would end up writing excellent final products.             While I may not have shed the curse of churning out crappy first drafts, I have come to recognize that they are indeed crappy and need revision. I believe the feedback my instructor provided has been a huge help to me in the revising process. It is always constructive, never critical, and it illuminates weaknesses in my writing that I could not have imagined were there. The first thing I did when I revised my papers was to make whatever changes my instructor suggested. Then I would read the essay aloud, and find places where the wording was awkward or the ideas didn’t necessarily fit in with the rest of the essay. Once I had made those changes, I would make an outline in reverse to see whether or not the essay was structured logically, if my thesis was present throughout the body of the essay, and if my conclusion was relevant but not redundant. If there seemed to be a problem with the essay after outlining it, I would rearrange things or add new ideas to make it more logical and well structured. Lastly, I double-checked my spelling and mechanics, and asked a friend to read it and make sure that it at least made sense to someone other than me. My final reading of each essay proved to me that I had written something that addressed the prompt, made a point and supported it, engaged with the audience appropriately, and that I was proud of.             It is my sincere hope that in reviewing my portfolio it becomes apparent the amount of effort I put into writing and revising my essays. While effort may not be a criterion for grading, it has enabled me to produce essays that I find to be meritorious on the rubric.    With many thanks,                  Student #1
Reflective Cover letter of Portfolio -600words
Example Portfolio Letter – Student #3 Dear Portfolio Reviewers,      I would begin with something along the lines of “writing and I have always had a troubled relationship” or “I’ve never been much of a writer,” but, unless this is the first portfolio letter you’re reading, you’ve probably seen that opening more times than you can count.  In any case, describing my relationship with writing as troubled would be oversimplifying the issue.      Let’s start by going back to assignment 1, where I reflected on the variability of my writing proficiency depending on the type of writing.  In the context of open-ended creative writing, I can honestly say that I love writing.  I love being able to tell a story and entertain people.  Unfortunately, I’ve yet to find that beauty in less open-ended writings.  That’s not to say I hate non-creative writing, just that I don’t love it.  For example, last summer I wrote a paper about a small research study I’d performed with little trouble.  The result wasn’t a piece of art, but it was accurate, honest, and easy to follow.  In reflecting on that paper at the beginning of the quarter, I couldn’t figure out why I’d done so well on it.      Over the course of the quarter, however, I’ve come to realize the connection between that structured academic paper and freeform creative writing assignments: organization.  Neither type of paper required much planning.  Most of the creative writing papers I’ve written are narratives, which typically progress chronologically.  Thus, as long as each of my ideas connected to the next, I was able to write a well-organized story.  Similarly, the academic paper I wrote had a very well defined structure.  Our professor gave us an outline of all the sections our papers should contain, so I followed his guidelines and the result was a well-organized paper.  After making that connection, I realized that my main problem with most papers is developing a structure, and have focused on that throughout the quarter.      I chose to include assignment 2 because I feel that it demonstrates my organizational progress, particularly when juxtaposed with assignment 4.  The second assignment had a relatively open ended prompt, but because I chose a handbook for my genre I was able to develop a clear structure using headings and subheadings.  This approach allowed me to organize my thoughts and communicate them to my reader.  My second reason for including assignment 2 was its difficult topic.  I decided to write about the issue of bad teaching, targeting high school teachers as my audience.  While I have many ideas regarding what makes a teacher good or bad, addressing teachers directly posed the challenge of giving advice without causing offense.  For example, upon first considering bad teaching I thought of a particularly bad high school experience and planned to include it in my paper.  However, after the first draft I realized that it would be better to keep my paper positive (no one wants to read about all the things they’re doing wrong), so I changed it to a short anecdote from one of my favorite classes.  I also added many sentence-level revisions to maintain a positive and relatable tone.      Even if assignment 4 hadn’t been required for the portfolio, I would have included it.  The topic is one I find interesting and had already thought about beforehand, so I was able to focus on organizing my analysis.  I think this paper shows my progress in that regard.  I organized assignment 2 with headings and subheadings, but by assignment 4 I could produce a similarly well-organized paper without an obvious outline.  In addition to showing what I learned this quarter in terms of organization, it also integrates other concepts from the course, such as genres and writing for an audience.  Most of my revision was at the sentence level, as my tone and word choice were at times too informal.      While I will definitely need to keep thinking about my papers’ structures in future writing, UWP 1 has significantly improved my ability to organize a paper, which will certainly help me in future writing.  Furthermore, it has given me a better understanding of writing for a specific audience and genre, which will help me ensure that the style and tone of my writing is appropriate.      Thank you for your time, and I hope you enjoy reading my papers. Sincerely, Student #3